Saturday, January 14

Making a Bulletin Board

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Don't you just love those 
oversized bulletin boards 
in the Ballard Designs catalog?
So beautiful, but a bit pricey at $100 - $300.

My friend, Mary, needed a large bulletin board
& I decided to try to make one for her.
I was moderately successful & 
I wanted to share what I've learned
{& tell you what I'd do differently next time}.

The project starts with this thrift store frame
from Nellie's birthday party . . .
{Mary owns a brightly-colored store, so it was just right.}
Right off the bat, I hit a SNAG.
The frame was wider than all cork rolls available locally.
Ugh.
Since time was an issue,
I bought what I could get from my local craft store
{home improvement stores don't carry it}
& ended up piecing it.
I regret this & next time I'll order a wider cork
on-line at a place like this.
At Home Depot, they custom cut a piece of
"hardboard" or "masonite" for the back of the
bulletin board.


I used a spray adhesive & hot glue {around the edges only}
to adhere the cork to the hardboard.


To hide the kindergarten tacky look of the pieced cork, 
I covered it with a piece of fabric.
I also gave my friend a calendar & some cute tacks.
COST BREAKDOWN:

  • Frame - $5 from the thrift store
  • Paint for frame - free, I already had it
  • Hardboard for backing - $2 - $8 for a huge sheet {lots left over for future projects} I only used about 1/4 of it
  • Fabric - $8
  • Cork roll - $15 with coupon

******************************************************
       Total - $30 {I figure I could make a nice Ballard-style board for around $60 - theirs is $200!}

WHAT I'D DO DIFFERENTLY NEXT TIME:
  • Splurge for the wider cork {or make a smaller bulletin board} so it looks more like the one in the Ballard catalog
  • Put a layer of cardboard between the cork & the hard back board OR use a double layer of cork - the cork I used was too thin & the tack hits the back board before it feels "deep enough"